New Yorkers say race relations in state aren’t so good

New Yorkers say race relations in state aren’t so good
Potsdam's Black Lives Matter group during one of their demonstrations last year. (Source: wwny)

LOUDONVILLE, N.Y. (WWNY) - Less than a third of New Yorkers believe race relations in the state are positive.

According to results of a Siena College poll released on Martin Luther King Jr. Day, 31 percent think race relations excellent (7 percent) or good (24 percent), compared to 64 percent who say they are fair (40 percent) or poor (24 percent).

Pollsters say that 31-64 percent finding is identical to what it was in June 2020 and down slightly from 33-64 percent on Martin Luther King Jr. Day 2020.

In 2011, 55 percent viewed race relations positively.

“Consistently over the last six years, fewer than 40 percent of New Yorkers have said that race relations are excellent or good,” pollster Steven Greenberg said. “Today, only 31 percent say it, compared to a decade ago, MLK Day 2011, when 55 percent of New Yorkers thought race relations were positive.”

The Black Lives Matter movement has a 56-33 percent favorability rating, down from 66-26 percent in June.

Forty-eight percent of voters think the Black Lives Matter movement has had a positive impact on America, while 32 percent say it has had a negative impact and 13 percent say it has had no real impact.

“Democrats overwhelmingly view the Black Lives Matter movement favorably, 77-16 percent, and more than two-thirds of Democrats think the BLM movement has had a positive impact on America. Independent voters are more mixed, viewing BLM favorably by a narrow 44-40 percent margin and a plurality thinking the movement has had a negative impact on the country,” Greenberg said.

“Republicans view BLM unfavorably by a strong 62-27 percent margin” he said, “and a strong majority say BLM has had a negative impact on the nation.”

Greenberg says one-third of New Yorkers say that they have been treated unfairly over the last year because of their race, religion, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.

“More than two-thirds say that racial and religious minorities experience discrimination because of how they look or how they choose to pray,” he said.

The poll was conducted January 10-13 by telephone and online among 804 New York state registered voters.

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