Advertisement

Lisha May Skeldon, 28, of Watertown

Published: Mar. 15, 2021 at 4:24 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn
On Wednesday, March 10th, 2021 the true “wild child” herself, Lisha May Skeldon, a daughter,...
On Wednesday, March 10th, 2021 the true “wild child” herself, Lisha May Skeldon, a daughter, sister, niece, aunt, and mother of three beautiful, strong children lost her life to addiction at the age of 28.(Source: Funeral Home)

WATERTOWN, N.Y. (WWNY) - On Wednesday, March 10th, 2021 the true “wild child” herself, Lisha May Skeldon, a daughter, sister, niece, aunt, and mother of three beautiful, strong children lost her life to addiction at the age of 28.

A Celebration of Life to honor Lisha and her family will be held March 20th from 3:00pm – 7:00pm at Meme’s Diner (formerly known as the Golden Unicorn) in Felts Mills. Lisha will have a private viewing for family only.

Lisha was predeceased by her grandmother, Linda Skeldon, and her great-grandparents, Lillian and Kenneth Simmons.

Lisha leaves behind her three children, Aleigha Champion, Aliisah Champion, Alijah Champion; her mother, Lisa Jones and spouse Michael Lemon; two stepsisters, Brionna Graf, Shykarra Lemon; her father, Scott (Debbie) Skeldon; two stepsiblings, Makayla Cummings, Kyle Burr; and three siblings, Brent Jarett and wife, Trevor Skeldon and partner, & Ashley Miller and spouse. Also surviving are thirteen nieces and nephews, several aunts, uncles, and cousins, and numerous lifelong friends whom she loved as if they were blood relatives.

Lisha was an amazing, beautiful, loud, often in trouble but very smart woman who lost her fight to a terrible addiction. Lisha was born November 18, 1992 in typical Lisha May Skeldon style, born at home in Edwards, NY right on the kitchen floor. From that day forward Lisha lived life by her own set of rules, and LIVE IT is what she did to the max.

Lisha loved to play softball (we never did see her play, however, because it was while she was incarcerated) but we heard she was a great player. Lisha worked several jobs, either on the “outside” at fast food restaurants or on the “inside” while incarcerated. Lisha enjoyed being loud, flipping you the bird, and was fluent in that “dirty old sailor language.” Her favorite color was pink, and she loved anything with rainbows.

If you were to ask those who knew her, I’m sure they’d describe Lisha in various ways. While some would claim she was intimidating, crazy, sneaky, selfish, or even a thief, at her core, Lisha was smart-witted, sharp-tongued, kind, beautiful, funny, generous, and loyal; all characteristics that define a true “wild child”.

Addiction isn’t a word that should forever define or encapsulate Lisha. Individuals who truly knew Lisha would agree that she was loyal to a fault, would do anything for you (even if that meant she had to lie or steal), and loved with her entire heart. After all, who would honestly rob a business to parole their boyfriend from jail?

Lisha let it be known that no one messed with her family. She was a fighter, and would personally take care of family matters; even if that meant spending a night or two behind bars. She loved her mother and children fiercely. Even while incarcerated she made sure to send her children letters, gifts, and cards. She would call her mother every day to reaffirm that she loved her and assure her that she’d be home for good this time. Lisha never lost sight of her family’s birthday’s either, religiously sending birthday cards and letters.

When Lisha walked into a room you’d either gather all of your belongings very quickly and hold them for dear life or you would watch the room light up with her contagious smile and wild sense of humor (her humor ranged from “PG” to an “R” rating.)

No one wakes up one day and says to themselves “I want to be an addict.” No family wants to watch someone they love struggle with addiction or frequent rehabilitation center trips and the criminal justice system. In spite of her best efforts, in the end Lisha was simply not equipped to endure the struggles she endured on her path of self-destruction. And, while there is no easy answer or book about why someone becomes an addict, one thing is for certain: everyone’s addiction is their own, as is their path to sobriety.

The “lonely rollercoaster” ride is over for Lisha. The many years of wondering how this would one day unfold for her family has been revealed. Her mother, Lisa, urges anyone reading this obituary to have difficult discussions with your family, educate your children, and remember Lisha as anything other than an “addict.”

Donations may be made in her memory to the Watertown Urban Mission Bridge Program, 247 Factory Street, Watertown, NY 13601.

Arrangements are with Reed & Benoit Funeral Home, Inc.

Condolences may be made online at reedbenoit.com

Copyright 2021 WWNY. All rights reserved.